The Latest

The title of the work is identical to a series of photographs by Huseyin shot in Odessa, showing curtains blowing in the wind. These images inspired an installation of hardened lace curtains, frozen in time and space. The work refers to the gesture of opening the windows to set free the soul of the deceased, as well as the idea of a spirit present in a room, mysteriously lifting the curtains to reveal its presence.
Gabriel Lester,Melancholia in Arcadia (2011)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jul 23, 2014 / 153 notes

The title of the work is identical to a series of photographs by Huseyin shot in Odessa, showing curtains blowing in the wind. These images inspired an installation of hardened lace curtains, frozen in time and space. The work refers to the gesture of opening the windows to set free the soul of the deceased, as well as the idea of a spirit present in a room, mysteriously lifting the curtains to reveal its presence.

Gabriel Lester,Melancholia in Arcadia (2011)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

It’s like trying to see in the dark: it takes a while before you start to see outlines and can identify individual objects.
Maaike Schoorel, Black Still Life with Glasses and Flowers (2010)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jul 21, 2014

It’s like trying to see in the dark: it takes a while before you start to see outlines and can identify individual objects.

Maaike Schoorel, Black Still Life with Glasses and Flowers (2010)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

For the series “The Widow,”exhibited in 1997, a young girl was posed in costumes and guises referencing art historical iconography.
Inez van lamsweerde, The Widow (White), (1997)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection
Jul 18, 2014 / 1 note

For the series “The Widow,”exhibited in 1997, a young girl was posed in costumes and guises referencing art historical iconography.

Inez van lamsweerde, The Widow (White), (1997)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Guido van der Werve looks in his work for a direct form of communication with its audience, which is similar to music. He makes video work based on performance, in which he usually composes its own soundtrack. His most famous movie is ’ number eight’, in which he walks on a frozen ocean in front of an icebreaker. Van der Werve usually stars in himself in his short films.  
Guido van der Werve, Nummer acht - Everything is going to be allright (2007) 
18mm to HD, 10’10”, Golf of Bothnia Kerni, FIN
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection
Jul 16, 2014 / 1 note

Guido van der Werve looks in his work for a direct form of communication with its audience, which is similar to music. He makes video work based on performance, in which he usually composes its own soundtrack. His most famous movie is ’ number eight’, in which he walks on a frozen ocean in front of an icebreaker. Van der Werve usually stars in himself in his short films.  

Guido van der Werve, Nummer acht - Everything is going to be allright (2007) 

18mm to HD, 10’10”, Golf of Bothnia Kerni, FIN

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

'My photographs aren't meant as portraits. That's also why I don't give them titles.' Hellen van Meene is trying to do something different when she photographs her subjects, young girls hovering on the edge of adulthood
Hellen van Meene, untitled (1999)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jul 14, 2014 / 1 note

'My photographs aren't meant as portraits. That's also why I don't give them titles.' Hellen van Meene is trying to do something different when she photographs her subjects, young girls hovering on the edge of adulthood

Hellen van Meene, untitled (1999)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

In his oeuvre, Koelewijn shows that the things that really matter lie beyond the realm of our control. Ideas and stories may be set out in books, but only come to life when they are read. Koelewijn seeks his means of expression within the power and fleeting nature of this paradox. 
Job Koelewijn, The Nursery Piece (2009-2010)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jul 11, 2014

In his oeuvre, Koelewijn shows that the things that really matter lie beyond the realm of our control. Ideas and stories may be set out in books, but only come to life when they are read. Koelewijn seeks his means of expression within the power and fleeting nature of this paradox. 

Job Koelewijn, The Nursery Piece (2009-2010)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

An important recurring theme in Ulay’s work is the search for identity. ‘Photography freezes a moment in less than 1/10th of a second,’ he says, ‘so it shows us things we can’t observe. I see photography as a wonderful supplemental tool for our visual perception.’
Uwe Laysiepen, Self-Portrait (1990)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jul 9, 2014 / 2 notes

An important recurring theme in Ulay’s work is the search for identity. ‘Photography freezes a moment in less than 1/10th of a second,’ he says, ‘so it shows us things we can’t observe. I see photography as a wonderful supplemental tool for our visual perception.’

Uwe Laysiepen, Self-Portrait (1990)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

´Ik reis in jouw hoofd´ - I travel in your head - visual correspondent in Morocco is a project by visual artist Aline Thomassen and the Artoteek The Hague with sound compositions by the musician Lazaro Tejedor, in collaboration with Museum Het Domein, Sittard and GEM, museum of contemporary art The Hague.
Aline Thomassen, Ik reis in jouw hoofd (2004)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Jul 7, 2014

´Ik reis in jouw hoofd´ - I travel in your head - visual correspondent in Morocco is a project by visual artist Aline Thomassen and the Artoteek The Hague with sound compositions by the musician Lazaro Tejedor, in collaboration with Museum Het Domein, Sittard and GEM, museum of contemporary art The Hague.

Aline Thomassen, Ik reis in jouw hoofd (2004)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

The personal and the fantastic: Sebastiaan Bremer unites them in his work, drawing over photographs from his own past with thin, spidery lines and tiny, meandering dots. Some are immediately recognisable, and we see a childhood friend of the artist, the artist’s family on holiday or his grandmother’s living room.
Sebastian Bremer, Golden Age (2005)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jul 4, 2014 / 1 note

The personal and the fantastic: Sebastiaan Bremer unites them in his work, drawing over photographs from his own past with thin, spidery lines and tiny, meandering dots. Some are immediately recognisable, and we see a childhood friend of the artist, the artist’s family on holiday or his grandmother’s living room.

Sebastian Bremer, Golden Age (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Jul 2, 2014 / 1 note

In the heart of Utrecht adorn blue and red neon letters  Utrecht’s skyline: Imagine/Being there. These neon words on the roof of the Rabobank Netherlands building, close to the Central Station, are part of the work by Martin Riebeek. He made it commissioned by Rabobank International and Rabo bank Corporate Clients, the residents of the building at Croeselaan 23 in Utrecht.

Martin Riebeek, Imagine Being There, (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Orange is our favourite colour of today. A beautiful sunrise by Hans Broek shows us the city in a different light.
 Hans Broek, Universal City (1999)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jun 30, 2014 / 1 note

Orange is our favourite colour of today. A beautiful sunrise by Hans Broek shows us the city in a different light.

 Hans Broek, Universal City (1999)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Light, space and time make us aware of what surrounds us. For JCJ Vanderheyden, this concept is at once both the starting point and the conclusion. Vanderheyden focuses on reality and art history, examining what our eye sees and what we take in. A clear blue sky, an endless horizon or the world as a stage. Throughout his body of work over the years, set themes recur, which the artist reuses and rearranges in new ways, adding a level of significance to the temporal aspect of his work.
JCJ Vanderheyden, After Hieronymus Bosch (1998)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jun 27, 2014 / 538 notes

Light, space and time make us aware of what surrounds us. For JCJ Vanderheyden, this concept is at once both the starting point and the conclusion. Vanderheyden focuses on reality and art history, examining what our eye sees and what we take in. A clear blue sky, an endless horizon or the world as a stage. Throughout his body of work over the years, set themes recur, which the artist reuses and rearranges in new ways, adding a level of significance to the temporal aspect of his work.

JCJ Vanderheyden, After Hieronymus Bosch (1998)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Jun 25, 2014 / 79 notes

The multidisciplinary work of the Belgian visual artist Hans op de Beeck consists of sculptures, installations, video work, photography, animated films, drawings, paintings and writing (short stories). Thematically, the work concentrates on our laborious and problematic relationship with time, space and each other.

Hans op de Beeck, Extensions (2009)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

 ’When you try to feel it, space is nothing,’ says Peeters
Antonietta Peeters, Rivers (2001)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jun 23, 2014 / 2 notes

 ’When you try to feel it, space is nothing,’ says Peeters

Antonietta Peeters, Rivers (2001)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Marc Bijl calls himself an art activist. His video installations, sculptures and graffiti are based on subjects such as mass culture, religion, globalisation/anti-globalisation and politics.
Marc Bijl, The Union, European Culture Flag (2004)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection
Jun 20, 2014 / 1 note

Marc Bijl calls himself an art activist. His video installations, sculptures and graffiti are based on subjects such as mass culture, religion, globalisation/anti-globalisation and politics.

Marc Bijl, The Union, European Culture Flag (2004)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection