The Latest

Apr 18, 2014 / 76 notes

Sculptures with a painting-like quality, or paintings occupying space like a sculpture. David Jablonowski sculpts with the eyes of a painter. He approaches the art of contemporary sculpting with the understanding that while it is primarily two-dimensional, fleeting images that dominate today’s world, in fact very little has changed. He draws deep connections between billboards and advertising displays and the primal function of sculpture: ritual, faith, recollection. The collective memories of artworks, and the cultural heritage they communicate, are an inexhaustible source of inspiration.

David Jablonowski, Grabskulptur (2008)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Matthew Monahan gives us objects that bellow with life. They point towards something eternal, but are very much of this world. These sublime forms have always been a means of coming closer to eternity, closer to the meaning of it all. But most importantly, they are intended to make life more bearable. They offer hope, forge bonds between peoples, or tell stories that rouse memories of our ancestors.
Matthew Monahan, Rust never sleeps (2011)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection
Apr 16, 2014 / 65 notes

Matthew Monahan gives us objects that bellow with life. They point towards something eternal, but are very much of this world. These sublime forms have always been a means of coming closer to eternity, closer to the meaning of it all. But most importantly, they are intended to make life more bearable. They offer hope, forge bonds between peoples, or tell stories that rouse memories of our ancestors.

Matthew Monahan, Rust never sleeps (2011)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

In her drawings and paintings, Marlene Dumas captures both the fragility and the strength of humanity.
Marelene Dumas, Dead Man (1988)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Apr 14, 2014

In her drawings and paintings, Marlene Dumas captures both the fragility and the strength of humanity.

Marelene Dumas, Dead Man (1988)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

Henk Visch’s love of language underlies the artist’s ever-expanding oeuvre. Since 1980, he has been creating expressions of the world around him in sculptures, drawings and language. ‘As an artist, you are working in a transient domain,’ says Visch. ‘You understand that everything exists for only an impossibly brief instant. Everything is a dream that’s gone before you know it, a bird that sings and flies off. But it is at the heart of this transience that you find the moments that something is created. Those are the moments you want to capture. That’s what art is.’
Henk Visch, We ran out of sweets (2010)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Apr 11, 2014 / 75 notes

Henk Visch’s love of language underlies the artist’s ever-expanding oeuvre. Since 1980, he has been creating expressions of the world around him in sculptures, drawings and language. ‘As an artist, you are working in a transient domain,’ says Visch. ‘You understand that everything exists for only an impossibly brief instant. Everything is a dream that’s gone before you know it, a bird that sings and flies off. But it is at the heart of this transience that you find the moments that something is created. Those are the moments you want to capture. That’s what art is.’

Henk Visch, We ran out of sweets (2010)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

Julie Verhoeven said in an interview about her drawings: “I like it if something collapses and distorts” The uncontrollable and distressing impact of images can be found in Skin Deep, which is  strengthened by the use of watercolor. Also the use of striking colors, a characteristic of Julie Verhoeven, contributes to the effect of the drawing; as if he really crawls under the skin.
Julie Verhoeven, Skin Deep (2005)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Apr 9, 2014 / 2 notes

Julie Verhoeven said in an interview about her drawings: “I like it if something collapses and distorts” The uncontrollable and distressing impact of images can be found in Skin Deep, which is  strengthened by the use of watercolor. Also the use of striking colors, a characteristic of Julie Verhoeven, contributes to the effect of the drawing; as if he really crawls under the skin.

Julie Verhoeven, Skin Deep (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

Seeing through the lines.
Erik van Lieshout, Actor and Me (2012)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Apr 7, 2014

Seeing through the lines.

Erik van Lieshout, Actor and Me (2012)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

Over the course of his career, Aernout Mik has focused increasingly explicitly on the depiction of the unsettling current events that have a direct impact on our living environment. 
Aernout Mik, Swab (1999)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Apr 4, 2014 / 51 notes

Over the course of his career, Aernout Mik has focused increasingly explicitly on the depiction of the unsettling current events that have a direct impact on our living environment. 

Aernout Mik, Swab (1999)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

Painting in an innovative way when people want traditional. Declaring the art of painting dead just when it’s coming back into fashion. Exhibiting profound social engagement with innumerable models, manifestos and drawings. Only to then return to painting. This was the artistic path of Constant A. Nieuwenhuys (Constant). Against the grain, playful, but with conviction.
Constant, Crowd (1993)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
Apr 2, 2014 / 175 notes

Painting in an innovative way when people want traditional. Declaring the art of painting dead just when it’s coming back into fashion. Exhibiting profound social engagement with innumerable models, manifestos and drawings. Only to then return to painting. This was the artistic path of Constant A. Nieuwenhuys (Constant). Against the grain, playful, but with conviction.

Constant, Crowd (1993)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

Delicate yet life-sized, the pastels and charcoal drawings of Iris van Dongen depict in fine detail a dark dreamworld populated by young women, lost in a wood, looking out over an invisible vista or approaching the viewer.
Iris van Dongen, Mist (2002)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection
Mar 31, 2014 / 2 notes

Delicate yet life-sized, the pastels and charcoal drawings of Iris van Dongen depict in fine detail a dark dreamworld populated by young women, lost in a wood, looking out over an invisible vista or approaching the viewer.

Iris van Dongen, Mist (2002)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

"Stagnation and movement as opposing forces form a fundamental motif that recurs in many of my works." Lonnie van Brummelen
Lonnie van Brummelen, movistar (1999) 
film (16 mm), kleur
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection
Mar 28, 2014 / 2,751 notes

"Stagnation and movement as opposing forces form a fundamental motif that recurs in many of my works." Lonnie van Brummelen

Lonnie van Brummelen, movistar (1999) 

film (16 mm), kleur

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

For Desiree Dolron, photographs are like studies: ‘It’s just like in painting,’ she says. ‘You have to first make a sketch before you start painting with oils. In my work, the photos are the sketches.’
Désiree Dolron, Shiva-rati, India (1991)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection
Mar 26, 2014 / 2 notes

For Desiree Dolron, photographs are like studies: ‘It’s just like in painting,’ she says. ‘You have to first make a sketch before you start painting with oils. In my work, the photos are the sketches.’

Désiree Dolron, Shiva-rati, India (1991)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

For over forty years is Jan van Munster true to the energy theme. With materials like granite and neon he made works on heat and cold, magnetism and radioactivity, and about light and electricity.
Jan van Munster, Ronde tweehoek (1985)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection.
Mar 24, 2014 / 2 notes

For over forty years is Jan van Munster true to the energy theme. With materials like granite and neon he made works on heat and cold, magnetism and radioactivity, and about light and electricity.

Jan van Munster, Ronde tweehoek (1985)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection
.

Navid Nuurs art is never finished, simply because he is not interested in the end result.
Navid Nuur, Study 55-66 (1984-2012)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection.
Mar 21, 2014 / 84 notes

Navid Nuurs art is never finished, simply because he is not interested in the end result.

Navid Nuur, Study 55-66 (1984-2012)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection.

Artist duo Liet Heringa (1966) and Maarten van Kalsbeek (1962) have been working together since the mid-1990s to an expressive and Baroque oeuvre.’Like flowers and trees grow in nature, are our images created  in an organic way’ explains Maarten Van Kalsbeek.
Heringa van Kalfsbeek, Zonder titel (2008)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection.
Mar 19, 2014 / 3 notes

Artist duo Liet Heringa (1966) and Maarten van Kalsbeek (1962) have been working together since the mid-1990s to an expressive and Baroque oeuvre.’Like flowers and trees grow in nature, are our images created  in an organic way’ explains Maarten Van Kalsbeek.

Heringa van Kalfsbeek, Zonder titel (2008)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection.

'What I try to share with the viewer,' explains Koos Breukel, 'is the effect of a first meeting. You don't have much information about the person, but you do have the same curiosity that a photographer has: “How are you, what's your story?”' A viewer of Breukel's photographs will recognize this approach, but will also see that his work is too intense for a fleeting first impression.

Koos Breukel , Ti (2011)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.Rabo Art Collection.
Mar 17, 2014 / 2 notes

'What I try to share with the viewer,' explains Koos Breukel, 'is the effect of a first meeting. You don't have much information about the person, but you do have the same curiosity that a photographer has: “How are you, what's your story?”' A viewer of Breukel's photographs will recognize this approach, but will also see that his work is too intense for a fleeting first impression.

Koos Breukel , Ti (2011)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection.